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Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans"
      #104782 - 12/05/08 03:32 AM

Has anyone heard of this hunter and his book?

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gryphon
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: NitroX]
      #104796 - 12/05/08 05:33 AM

Try this mate.


Literature


Shikar tales from the Sunderbans
Khaleel Mahmood

I was born in Sialkot, in what used to be called West Pakistan. As a boy I lived for some time during the early 1960s in Chittagong due to my father being deputed to then East Pakistan. Unlike Tahawar Ali Khan, the author of these 1950s shikar tales of the Sunderban forests, I was not fortunate enough to see the famed mangrove forest at that time. Though I have been given to understand now from Bangladeshi acquaintances that the forests have been sadly depleted, in every sense of the term, by human encroachment and criminal activities, in my boyhood it represented a dangerous and unknown territory, into which human beings ventured at risk of life and limb. I remember my father had a Pathan orderly, an avid shikari who spent the larger part of his spare time diligently cleaning and oiling his beloved shotgun and rifle, but who, despite heartfelt requests, was not permitted by my father travel into the Sundarbans in search of maneaters.

Tahawar Ali Khan, as his book Maneaters of Sunderbans (published from Lahore in 1961) demonstrates, was a sporting man of a very different mettle. Until the literary editor of this paper requested me, and was kind enough to courier me a copy, to comment on this book I confess that I was unaware of its existence. I enquired casually of some Pakistanis here in New York about the author, but unfortunately the trail of Tahawar seems to have disappeared into the mangrove-rooted mists of time. It seems that his family after immigrating from India in 1947 settled in the Gulbarg area of Lahore, and his sons are known to have shared their father's taste for shikar. In the book's introduction Tahawar describes his own father as being "a renowned hunter (and) master of jungle craft" who was "transferred to Lakhimpur in the wild Kheri district bordering Nepal in Himalayan foothills." It was here that the boy Tahawar was schooled in the jungle trade by an uncle, learning to stalk and shoot big game in the tall elephant grass.

Tahawar first came to the East Pakistan as "a roving journalist" in 1956, and fell in love with its "rich forests and...mighty rivers." He was later included as a member of a "shooting party" arranged in honour of the visiting Prince Abdul Reza Pahlavi of Iran. This experience gave him his first exposure to the Sunderbans, and in 1957 and 1958 he came back, armed with not only hunting gear but also cameras, which accounts for some accompanying photos in the book.

The Lakhimpur-Kheri district of Tahawar's shikar boyhood is in Uttar Pradesh, where hunting was traditional in the more notable Muslim families. It is not far from the legendary Jim Corbett's hunting grounds of Garhwal-Kumaon, and it is perhaps natural that Corbett's shadow looms large over Tahawar's book. In fact, some may say, a little too large. Tahawar not only doffs his beret to the great white shikari many times in the book, but also fashions large parts of his shikar yarns after Corbett's style, specially where he impart jungles lore to readers. Where Tahawar differs from Corbett is in the setting. Hunting maneaters in the mangrove forest (he shot two maneaters, having been asked to do so by the Forest Service) is a very different thing than doing it in Corbett country:

"The Sunderbans is not scrub forest in open country where hills, alleys, ravines and isolated clumps of trees provide unmistakable landmarks for direction-finding. It is dense jungle where all trees more or less look alike, and there are no hills or ravines to guide you. The creeks make you change direction very often till you don't know where you are, and -- most important of all -- you don't know where the tiger is. For the same reasons, you seldom know whether you are travelling with or against the wind in the forest, and this is a factor that gives the maneater a big advantage over you."

It is this very different shikar terrain - swampy, watery, humid, with shifting tides and overcast skies, peopled by honey gatherers and wood cutters - that gives Tahawar's shikar tales of the Sunderbans such a different feel. The Royal Bengal Tiger, from the time of the travelling French priest Francois Bernier (Travels in the Mughal Empire 1656-1668), had a reputation for ferocity, and it was still living up to it when Tahawar roamed the Sundarbans in search of it, leaving behind only the heads of its victims after eating the rest of the body. There are some photos in the book which are not for the squeamish!

With the hindsight of the tragic history of Pakistan, it was gratifying for me to read how much Tahawar came to love the forest: "Sunderbans! Spewed up by the impatient sea and set like a unique emerald upon its sapphire breast! The dense forest, dark green and mysterious; the luxuriant trees, half-veiled by purple shadows; the beach, gleaming like polished silver; the wrinkled turquoise, blue ocean, breaking on its shore in tumbling, foam-crested, sun-spangled waves..." He came to know the chars, channels, islands and khals intimately, and got along well with the forest's inhabitants and the Bengali forest trackers and rangers. Tahawar thus has left behind a unique chronicle, in words as well as in photos, of how the Sunderban forests in then East Pakistan seemed to one man during that now lost, and politically troubled, era.

He was also unavoidably a man of his time, and therefore readers may note that the language of his book is shot through with an outdated British idiom, which is perhaps the result of a mission school upbringing as well as the fact that hunting tigers in India and Pakistan in the mid- to late '50s, barely a decade after independence, was still a tradition left over from the British colonialists. Another thing to note is that, unlike the later Jim Corbett, who evolved into a naturalist and wrote some of the first passages about the flora and fauna of Naini Tal, Tahawar unfortunately did not record, except in passing, the Sundarban's stupendous variety of natural life. One wishes that he had done so. It would have made a rare account of a magical natural wonder that much more valuable.

Khaleel Mahmood is a Pakistani expatriate in New York. He is a retired doctor/volunteer at a community health clinic and amateur naturalist.

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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: gryphon]
      #104871 - 12/05/08 02:16 PM

OK now the impossible. Anyone know of the book for sale at a reasonable price? I have found one at quite a high price. Anyone in India, Pakistan or Bangladesh know of copies for sale?

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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: NitroX]
      #104874 - 12/05/08 03:26 PM



The following are from Google:

http://www.pakdef.info/forum/showthread.php?t=6631

http://www.thedailystar.net/story.php?nid=3996

http://www.pakdef.info/pakmilitary/a...arindex.html

http://www.pakdef.info/pakmilitary/a.../warindex.html

These were on Googel from a User: SSAAD

May help, may not.

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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: CHAPUISARMES]
      #104898 - 12/05/08 11:43 PM

That Dialy Star article is an interesting read. Love the penultimate paragraph!


Quote:

On a Shikari and an Ode on an Ode
Waqar A. Khan, Bangladesh Forum for Heritage Studies.
Published On: 2007-09-15
I was riveted by the publication (The Daily Star literature page, July 28th), of an excerpt from a long-forgotten book, Man-eaters of Sunderbans, (1961), by the then renowned Pakistani shikari, Tahawar Ali Khan, along with an article by Khaleel Mahmood, a Pakistani expatriate in New York.


I met Tahawar Ali Khan when he came to Dhaka from Lahore in 1967, at the onset of the Arab-Israeli war. He had come to the Sundarbans to shoot a man-eater, and had just succeeded in doing so.


The National Institute of Public Administration (NIPA) was planning on holding a program to introduce East Pakistan's culture and people to foreigners then in Dacca. My father was one of the main organizers of the event. He invited Tahawar Ali Khan to give a talk/slide-show presentation on the Sundarbans and share his exploits as a hunter. One morning, as the war raged on in the Middle East, we drove to Shahbagh Hotel to meet him.


Contrary to my boyhood expectation, I saw a rather stocky man of medium build, sporting a beret waving at us in the hotel lobby. My perception then of a big game hunter was of a much larger man. As Tahawar walked up to us, I observed that he had big, expressive eyes and a huge, disarming smile. He was glued to a small transistor radio. "Mr. Khan," he greeted my father loudly, "the Arabs are finally giving those bloody Israelis a good lesson, isn't it? I hear they are only a few miles from Tel Aviv!" My father merely smiled.


Pleasantries exchanged, Tahawar patted me on the head and grinned, "Shot your first tiger yet?" Seeing my embarrassed smile, he quipped, "Don't you worry, we will soon shoot one together." We sat for a while in the lobby as my father explained the scheduled program for the coming day. Tahawar confided that most people here mispronounced his name and called him 'Talwar Sahib' instead. He laughed and said that he actually took it as a compliment since it rhymed perfectly with Hazrat Ali's legendary sword - Zulfiqar! He presented us with an autographed copy of his book, Man-eaters of Sunderbans. Sadly, after decades of safekeeping it has now been lost.


On the appointed day, Tahawar showed up at the venue immaculately attired in an English tweed jacket, a silk cravat and still sporting a beret. He looked very much like an army officer of the colonial vintage. He spoke impressively in English to a captive audience of diplomats and transient visitors. There were also Bengali and Pakistani participants. The exotic and picturesque slide-show on the Sundarbans went down very well with the audience the flora, fauna, rivers, creeks and, of course, the dead tigers! Tahawar demonstrated the full-throated call of the tiger, the distress call of the cheetal (spotted deer) and the guttural noise of a prey in the vice-grip of the tiger. As a grand finale he made the repeated plaintive calls of a deer in the throes of death. Amplified by loudspeakers it sent a chill down my spine. In the end many eager hands went up and Tahawar was only too pleased to oblige.


The day Tahawar Ali Khan left Dhaka news filtered in of the humiliating defeat of the Arab forces at the hands of the Israelis. Initial jubilation had given way to collective gloom. Father and I went up to Tahawar's hotel room. He greeted us with a faint smile and a limp handshake. He was only half packed and looked crestfallen. “Khan Sahab,” he told my father with a grimace, “these bloody Arabs are no fighters, just big mouths!” There was silence. My father quoted to him the famous Suhrawardy one-liner on Arabs, that “zero plus zero always equals to zero.”


During small talk over tea and biscuits I looked at a stack of Sundarban pictures, including of dead man-eaters. Tahawar read my mind. With a flourish he selected some photographs, autographed them, and said “These are for you, son.” I was simply too elated and thanked him profusely. “Please come back and see us again,” I said. “I surely will,” he replied.


We would never meet again. Those coveted photographs are still with me forty years on.




Nice photo at http://www.thedailystar.net/story.php?nid=3996 but cannot post it


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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: NitroX]
      #133808 - 29/04/09 04:25 AM

Quote:

OK now the impossible. Anyone know of the book for sale at a reasonable price? I have found one at quite a high price. Anyone in India, Pakistan or Bangladesh know of copies for sale?




Mission Impossible II - any one seen it since?

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gryphon
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: NitroX]
      #133886 - 29/04/09 07:17 PM

Here are his sons details,i will have a copy of the book too haha

0300 843 7095 / 575 2015. My address is 129-E/1, Gulberg III, Main Boulevard Road, Lahore. Email: atz_adv@hotmail.com

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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: gryphon]
      #134614 - 06/05/09 08:42 AM

I have a proposal - if there are enough people who are interested in the book, I could get a new edition printed and published by arrangement with Mr Khan Jr - if the final price is workable. I have not contacted Mr Khan and shall not do this until there is sufficient interest. As a former editor, I do have friends through whom I could get this done. I'll be happy to keep all pricing open and public and do this without any financial interest for myself.

Please let me know if enough people are interested.

Good hunting, gentlemen.

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Saad
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: mehulkamdar]
      #136115 - 25/05/09 03:49 PM

Amazing that this book is being discussed here. I have a copy, probably first edition and signed by author. I bought it used. Author's son runs an arms & hunting accessories shop here. I will ask him if he has any copies of this book for sale.

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gryphon
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: Saad]
      #136123 - 25/05/09 08:15 PM

Ok put my name down for one too please Saad,thank you.

Other than that I will go with mehulkamdar

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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: gryphon]
      #136296 - 28/05/09 06:49 PM

Saad and Mehulkl,

I am interested.

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mehulkamdarModerator
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: NitroX]
      #136351 - 29/05/09 11:17 AM

Gentlemen,

I am hoping that Saad would respond shortly. In the meantime, I have sent Mr Khan the following e-mail based on Gryphon's post:

Dear Sir,

I am one of the moderators of the Asian Hunting Forums at www.nitroexpress.com where several members have been discussing your father Mr Tahawar Ali Khan's book "Maneaters of the Sunderbans," which, we understand, is now out of print. A discussion on the subject is at this link: http://forums.nitroexpress.com/showflat.php?Cat=0&Number=136296&Main=104782#Post136296

The purpose for my contacting you is to find out if you have any copies for sale for our members who are interested in buying a copy for their individual collections. If you do not have any copies, then, my second request, if you permit us to bring out a second edition, would be for the terms of the copyright that you / your family may hold and what terms you would offer for a limited reprint of the book either on paper or on DVD. Kindly note that We have had limited responses from members who are definitely interested in buying the book if available, but that we should have more people sign up if a concrete price were offered to them along with more details once you let us know of the terms that you would like to offer.

If you would like to talk to me, please do let me know - I shall gladly call you at any convenient time that you indicate in order to discuss the terms that you may have in mind.

With best wishes in anticipation of hearing from you on this request,

I remain,

Sincerely,

Mehul Kamdar

Chicago, IL.



Let us wait to hear what he says.

In the meantime, I have a question for whoever is interested in the book - we could have it either as a book or on DVD. The former would cost more in any case and the book could either be printed on high grade paper as a hard-bound book or cheaper as a paperback on ordinary paper, say like what is used in "Gun Digest" for example. A DVD would be very inexpensive to produce - companies like Moser Baer in Switzerland and India offer blank DVDs at ridiculously low prices. What would you prefer if you are interested in the book?

The reason for this is that the prices for both the paper version as well as a DVD version would be fixed except for the royalties that Mr Khan asks for. I hope to have some calculations worked out as soon as I hear from him.

Best wishes and good hunting!

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The Ark was made by amateurs. Experts built the Titanic.

Mehul Kamdar


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gryphon
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: mehulkamdar]
      #136383 - 30/05/09 06:05 AM

Great work mehulkamdar,terrific stuff and all very positive...Me? I love good books and good DVDS too haha...

I would go a book but would fit in with anyone else's idea so going with the flow is easy for me.Whatever it comes down to mate. Thumbs up!

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NitroXAdministrator
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: gryphon]
      #136405 - 30/05/09 01:57 PM

I prefer books too. But a DVD or CD of the book is better than nothing, cheap and easier to produce. And cheap to reproduce.

NE.com would probably look as acting as a sales agent/retailer on the net as well.

--------------------
John aka NitroX

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mehulkamdarModerator
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: NitroX]
      #136462 - 01/06/09 01:06 AM

Gryphon,

Thanks. I haven't heard back from Mr Khan yet. If I don't hear over the course of the next week, I'll call him on the phone or have a friend in Pakistan talk to him. Hopefully, Saad would respond too when he sees this thread.

John,

If Nitroexpress.com wants to promote this, it would be superb. Sending you a PM.

Good hunting!

--------------------
The Ark was made by amateurs. Experts built the Titanic.

Mehul Kamdar


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Saad
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: mehulkamdar]
      #136762 - 05/06/09 01:36 PM

I met Sultan Tahawar (son of Tahawar Ali Khan) a couple of days back and he said that has no copies for sale. And unfortunately he himself has no personal copy of this book!

Cant say about demand of book if reprinted. I wonder if any of worthy members have read this book?


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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: Saad]
      #136764 - 05/06/09 02:23 PM

Quote:

I met Sultan Tahawar (son of Tahawar Ali Khan) a couple of days back and he said that has no copies for sale. And unfortunately he himself has no personal copy of this book!

Cant say about demand of book if reprinted. I wonder if any of worthy members have read this book?




I mentioned to Mehul, sourcing a copy is the first big problem!

There was a copy on the net for sale, but it was beyond my wallet's ability and willingness to pay for.

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gryphon
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: NitroX]
      #136794 - 06/06/09 04:13 AM

I can certainly agree with you there JH as evidenced by the price below...twice!

MAN EATERS OF SUNDERBANS ~ Inscribed by the author
TAHAWAR ALI KHAN ~
Bookseller: SAFARI BOOKS
(Edmonton, AB, Canada)
Bookseller Rating: 5-star rating
Price: £ 376.58



1st Edition. Rare First printing. The author, a great fan of Jim Corbett, was able to bag several man eaters from the Sunderban jungles where Tiger was the king. Graphic details of tiger kills with graphic photographs. Numerous illustrations, 220 pages,INSCRIBED & SIGNED by the author on the half title page dated 17/7/71. A nice book. Signed by Author(s).



Man-eaters of Sunderbans (Unknown Binding)
by Tahawar Ali Khan (Author)
No customer reviews yet. Be the first.

Available from these sellers.


1 used from $1,070.59 err thats US dollars too mind you .

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gryphon
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: gryphon]
      #136795 - 06/06/09 04:18 AM

and another excerpt gleaned from the net...turned out to be a bit of a hunt for this fella`s book.


Literature


Shikar tales from the Sunderbans
Khaleel Mahmood

I was born in Sialkot, in what used to be called West Pakistan. As a boy I lived for some time during the early 1960s in Chittagong due to my father being deputed to then East Pakistan. Unlike Tahawar Ali Khan, the author of these 1950s shikar tales of the Sunderban forests, I was not fortunate enough to see the famed mangrove forest at that time. Though I have been given to understand now from Bangladeshi acquaintances that the forests have been sadly depleted, in every sense of the term, by human encroachment and criminal activities, in my boyhood it represented a dangerous and unknown territory, into which human beings ventured at risk of life and limb. I remember my father had a Pathan orderly, an avid shikari who spent the larger part of his spare time diligently cleaning and oiling his beloved shotgun and rifle, but who, despite heartfelt requests, was not permitted by my father travel into the Sundarbans in search of maneaters.

Tahawar Ali Khan, as his book Maneaters of Sunderbans (published from Lahore in 1961) demonstrates, was a sporting man of a very different mettle. Until the literary editor of this paper requested me, and was kind enough to courier me a copy, to comment on this book I confess that I was unaware of its existence. I enquired casually of some Pakistanis here in New York about the author, but unfortunately the trail of Tahawar seems to have disappeared into the mangrove-rooted mists of time. It seems that his family after immigrating from India in 1947 settled in the Gulbarg area of Lahore, and his sons are known to have shared their father's taste for shikar. In the book's introduction Tahawar describes his own father as being "a renowned hunter (and) master of jungle craft" who was "transferred to Lakhimpur in the wild Kheri district bordering Nepal in Himalayan foothills." It was here that the boy Tahawar was schooled in the jungle trade by an uncle, learning to stalk and shoot big game in the tall elephant grass.

Tahawar first came to the East Pakistan as "a roving journalist" in 1956, and fell in love with its "rich forests and...mighty rivers." He was later included as a member of a "shooting party" arranged in honour of the visiting Prince Abdul Reza Pahlavi of Iran. This experience gave him his first exposure to the Sunderbans, and in 1957 and 1958 he came back, armed with not only hunting gear but also cameras, which accounts for some accompanying photos in the book.

The Lakhimpur-Kheri district of Tahawar's shikar boyhood is in Uttar Pradesh, where hunting was traditional in the more notable Muslim families. It is not far from the legendary Jim Corbett's hunting grounds of Garhwal-Kumaon, and it is perhaps natural that Corbett's shadow looms large over Tahawar's book. In fact, some may say, a little too large. Tahawar not only doffs his beret to the great white shikari many times in the book, but also fashions large parts of his shikar yarns after Corbett's style, specially where he impart jungles lore to readers. Where Tahawar differs from Corbett is in the setting. Hunting maneaters in the mangrove forest (he shot two maneaters, having been asked to do so by the Forest Service) is a very different thing than doing it in Corbett country:

"The Sunderbans is not scrub forest in open country where hills, alleys, ravines and isolated clumps of trees provide unmistakable landmarks for direction-finding. It is dense jungle where all trees more or less look alike, and there are no hills or ravines to guide you. The creeks make you change direction very often till you don't know where you are, and -- most important of all -- you don't know where the tiger is. For the same reasons, you seldom know whether you are travelling with or against the wind in the forest, and this is a factor that gives the maneater a big advantage over you."

It is this very different shikar terrain - swampy, watery, humid, with shifting tides and overcast skies, peopled by honey gatherers and wood cutters - that gives Tahawar's shikar tales of the Sunderbans such a different feel. The Royal Bengal Tiger, from the time of the travelling French priest Francois Bernier (Travels in the Mughal Empire 1656-1668), had a reputation for ferocity, and it was still living up to it when Tahawar roamed the Sundarbans in search of it, leaving behind only the heads of its victims after eating the rest of the body. There are some photos in the book which are not for the squeamish!

With the hindsight of the tragic history of Pakistan, it was gratifying for me to read how much Tahawar came to love the forest: "Sunderbans! Spewed up by the impatient sea and set like a unique emerald upon its sapphire breast! The dense forest, dark green and mysterious; the luxuriant trees, half-veiled by purple shadows; the beach, gleaming like polished silver; the wrinkled turquoise, blue ocean, breaking on its shore in tumbling, foam-crested, sun-spangled waves..." He came to know the chars, channels, islands and khals intimately, and got along well with the forest's inhabitants and the Bengali forest trackers and rangers. Tahawar thus has left behind a unique chronicle, in words as well as in photos, of how the Sunderban forests in then East Pakistan seemed to one man during that now lost, and politically troubled, era.

He was also unavoidably a man of his time, and therefore readers may note that the language of his book is shot through with an outdated British idiom, which is perhaps the result of a mission school upbringing as well as the fact that hunting tigers in India and Pakistan in the mid- to late '50s, barely a decade after independence, was still a tradition left over from the British colonialists. Another thing to note is that, unlike the later Jim Corbett, who evolved into a naturalist and wrote some of the first passages about the flora and fauna of Naini Tal, Tahawar unfortunately did not record, except in passing, the Sundarban's stupendous variety of natural life. One wishes that he had done so. It would have made a rare account of a magical natural wonder that much more valuable.

Khaleel Mahmood is a Pakistani expatriate in New York. He is a retired doctor/volunteer at a community health clinic and amateur naturalist.
Picture

--------------------
Get off the chair away from the desk and get out in the bush and enjoy life.


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Saad
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: NitroX]
      #137161 - 11/06/09 10:35 PM

Quote:



I mentioned to Mehul, sourcing a copy is the first big problem!

There was a copy on the net for sale, but it was beyond my wallet's ability and willingness to pay for.




I have a copy and I can think selling it if I get good price.

Jokes apart I can get it photocopied for you. Though, my rating for this book is not very high.


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mehulkamdarModerator
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: Saad]
      #137167 - 12/06/09 12:14 AM

Saad,

Thank you very much for your offer to photocopy the book. However, if we get permission from Mr Khan's son, we could upload the book to this forum. We do have several fine books on the website as you may have noticed and this would be one more for our members to enjoy. This is a completely non-commercial offer, of course, as we welcome books, articles etc from all our members and post these here, but it would preserve the book electronically and make it available for anyone who is interested in the subject.

Please do check with Mr Sultan Khan and let us know if this is acceptable.

Thank you again for your very kind offer and good hunting!

--------------------
The Ark was made by amateurs. Experts built the Titanic.

Mehul Kamdar


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Saad
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: mehulkamdar]
      #137189 - 12/06/09 05:02 PM

Mehul,

I am an old visitor of this website and other forums as well. I know and appreciate the efforts and contribution of forum owners and moderators for our common passion about hunting, books and fine guns. I know that it is non-commercial and my remark about price was in lighter mood.

I will talk to author's son about permission. Would an e-mail from him would be sufficient? Or some legal document needs to be signed?

By the way, do you have any old books from Indian authors that could be re-produced. I have read a few old timers and consider these far better then the book we are discussing here. I have some books but all are in Urdu language.


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gryphon
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: Saad]
      #137193 - 12/06/09 06:06 PM

all sounds good to me so far.

--------------------
Get off the chair away from the desk and get out in the bush and enjoy life.


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mehulkamdarModerator
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: Saad]
      #137318 - 15/06/09 10:04 AM

Saad,

I know that your remark about price was in jest. That said, my request for the rights is, of course, a serious one. I am not sure what copyright laws in Pakistan are, but in India, as long as you don't make money on reproducing any work, you are fully legit. Also, copyrights in India expire 15 years after publication unlike other countries where they last much longer.

An e-mail from Mr Sultan Khan granting us permission to post the book in an official capacity would be enough.

While I speak both Dakhani and Lakhnavi Urdu, I cannot read the language, though, I could probably get books translated from Urdu into English. Again, the relevant author's permission would be important.

Thank you very much for your very generous offer of help and for speaking to Mr Sultan Khan. Hopefully, this record of hunting in a lost era could be preserved somehow and be made available to whoever is interested inr eading it.

Very good hunting and thanks again!

--------------------
The Ark was made by amateurs. Experts built the Titanic.

Mehul Kamdar


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NitroXAdministrator
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Reged: 25/12/02
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Re: Tahawar Ali Khan - "Maneaters of the Sunderbans" [Re: mehulkamdar]
      #156582 - 16/03/10 01:04 AM

BTTT ?

--------------------
John aka NitroX

...
Govt get out of our lives NOW!
"I love the smell of cordite in the morning."
"A Sharp spear needs no polish"


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